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Wednesday, 17 September 2014

Honours of War - Cover Art

Well now. I fully expected Osprey to draw on their wide range of already available images for the cover of my rules. But instead, they have gone ahead and commissioned a piece of original artwork. Nice. Very nice indeed. 

Men of Prussian IR18, Prinz von Preussen, charge into combat. The snow suggests Leuthen to me - the regiment was present on the Prussian right flank. The artist is Giuseppe Rava. I have always admired the rose pink facings of this regiment. Marvellous!

The playtest feedback I have received from the Yahoo group has been invaluable and has resulted in a large number of positive changes to Honours of War. I have 2 or 3 new playtesters still up my sleeve for final checks, but overall I'm pretty happy with how the rules are. Waiting until next November for publication will be a bit of a pain, but that's the world of publishing for you. At the moment, my two great fears are:

First, the obvious one - the rules are trashed by reviewers and players on publication, no one likes them, and I find I have let Osprey down. Oh, how I fear the wrath of TMP!

Second, having submitted the final manuscript in January 2015, I find that by November I have discovered any number of glitches in the rules, or thought of several ideas or improvements which I would love to include but can't. We all know that by the time Donald Featherstone had published War Games, he no longer used the rules that were contained within it. I am hardly in the Don's league, but you get my meaning. I guess there's really no way out of this one.

I am heartened by Osprey's decision to provide online support for their various rules (at least, that's my reading of the current situation - don't quote me). But if they don't, I will. This will allow me to address any problems and pass on corrections. And it will probably help sales as well.

Regardless of my fears, the whole process continues to be full of interest and enjoyment. I suppose in a way it's work, but it certainly doesn't feel like it. Thanks again to Phil Smith, Games Manager, Osprey Publishing, for giving me the chance to do this.

9 comments:

Steve J. said...

That is a great piece of artwork and should look fantastic on the cover. Glad that the playtesting is going so well.

Sgt Steiner said...

Nice art just a pity we have to wait so long to see it adorn your rules

Michael Peterson said...

That's a terrific illustration and I'm happy that your work is going ahead. I still have the draft you kindly sent me and will send you comments, for what they're worth, once I manage to break the back of my MA thesis.

Adam J said...

Brava!

Giuseppe Rava said...

Hi Keith, have you seen this thread on TMP?

http://theminiaturespage.com/boards/msg.mv?id=371868

Maybe you want to tell something to all those "experts".

Best regards,
Giuseppe Rava

Keith Flint said...

Thanks for pointing out the thread Guiseppe. I try and keep out of bad tempered TMP threads these days!

I will be proud to have your illustration on the rules - you are obviously a very talented illustrator. As you imply, nit-picking over details is really not worth it. But I would encourage you not to take such criticisms too personally. Let people have their say and don't allow them to get under your skin.

Best wishes, Keith.

Giuseppe Rava said...

Hi Keith, just if you wish to laugh a bit, scroll down till our cover art:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/Minden1759/817517741661135/?notif_t=like

Best regards,
Giuseppe

Keith Flint said...

Giuseppe, why do you rise to the bait? A polite acknowledgement of criticism is always best, even if it makes you angry.

But I think you enjoy taunting your accusers!

Unknown said...

What I cannot tolerate are the supposed "experts", who can't abstain from criticize everything don't come from them. I know I did a great job on that cover, cause I love that era, but they have to dirty it with their absurd critics. But probably what's worst is that they don't owe respect neither for a great painter like Carl Rochling, supposing he didn't know his job.